Heritage Florida Jewish News - Central Florida's Independent Jewish Voice

James Comey, fired by Trump and reviled by Democrats, had admirers among Jewish defense officials

 

Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

FBI Director James Comey preparing to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, May 3, 2017.

WASHINGTON (JTA)-"You make us better," James Comey told the Anti-Defamation League in his final public speech as FBI director.

Judging from the applause in the conference room at the venerable Mayflower Hotel here, the feeling was mutual.

Mired in investigations of the scandals of 2016 (Hillary Clinton's relationship with her email server) and 2017 (Donald Trump's relationship with Russia), not a lot of love ended up being lost between the FBI director and either party.

Democrats called for Comey's firing last year when a week and a half before the election he reopened the Clinton case because of emails found on the laptop of former congressman Anthony Weiner in an unrelated case.

President Donald Trump, who repeatedly praised the FBI director as a candidate, fired Comey on Tuesday, ostensibly because Comey treated Clinton unfairly last July-he excoriated her for her email habits in a news conference, but recommended against legal action.

The firing was drawing attention for its timing: Comey is delving into ties between the Trump campaign and transition officials who may have had ties to Russia.

Among the folks whose business it is to keep Jews safe-like those gathered Monday in the Mayflower for the ADL's leadership summit-admiration for Comey was fairly unequivocal. To a degree greater than most of his predecessors, he made the Jewish story central to the FBI mission.

Comey required all FBI staffers to undergo a tour of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

"Good people helped to murder millions. And that's the most frightening lesson of all," he told a museum dinner in 2015. "That is why I send our agents and our analysts to the museum. I want them to stare at us and realize our capacity for rationalization and moral surrender."

Comey, already known as a persuasive speaker, was especially adept at understanding what moved Jewish Americans. In his ADL speech this week, he recalled meeting a man who was not far from the scene when a gunman opened fire last June at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

"My name is Menachem Green and I'm Jewish," Comey quoted the man as saying, pronouncing Menachem impeccably, and went on to say that Green was pleased to tell him that he ran toward the shooting alongside a police officer he learned was a Muslim.

"We were Jew and Muslim and Christian and white and black and Latino running to help people we didn't know," Comey recalled Green saying.

Comey also noted the "Muslim activists who raised over $100,000 to repair Jewish headstones in St. Louis and Philadelphia-that makes us better."

The now former FBI chief also embraced one of the ADL's signature issues, improving reporting of hate crimes by local authorities.

"We must do a better job of tracking and reporting hate crime to fully understand what is happening in our country so we can stop it," he said.

Just a week earlier, Comey was due to receive a recognition award from the Secure Community Network, the security affiliate of the Jewish Federations of North America. Paul Goldenberg, the SCN director, said Comey was to be recognized for his work with the community in tracking down the perpetrator of dozens of bomb hoaxes on JCCs and other Jewish institutions.

"Director Comey put in extraordinary resources and showed tremendous commitment to the American Jewish community," Goldenberg said, noting that the FBI had deployed agents to Jewish communities across the states.

Comey could not personally accept the recognition, and SCN delivered it to a surrogate, because Comey was on the Hill testifying to the Senate about how he handled the email and Russia scandals.

In his testimony, he noted one of the FBI triumphs of recent months as a defense of the agency-helping to solve the JCC bomb threats.

"Children frightened, old people frightened, terrifying threats of bombs at Jewish institutions, especially the Jewish community centers-the entire FBI surged in response to that threat," Comey said in his opening remarks Wednesday to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

In March, an Israeli-American teen was arrested in Israel on suspicion of calling in more than 100 bomb threats. Last month, the U.S. Justice Department charged the teen, Michael Kadar, with making threatening calls to JCCs in Florida, conveying false information to the police and cyberstalking.

"Working across all programs, all divisions, our technical wizards, using our vital international presence and using our partnerships especially with the Israeli national police, we made that case and the Israelis locked up the person behind those threats and stopped the terrifying plague against the Jewish community centers," Comey said.

Comey may be gone, but the shock among Democrats-and some congressional Republicans-at his departure means his memory is unlikely to fade anytime soon.

"We must have a special prosecutor," Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., the minority leader in the Senate, said in a statement delivered at a briefing for reporters late Tuesday. Schumer said he told Trump in a phone call that firing Comey was a "very big mistake."

Trump fired back on Twitter, recalling that Schumer had said recently that he did not have confidence in Comey.

"Then acts so indignant," Trump said, calling the New York lawmaker "Cryin' Chuck Schumer."

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., the ranking Democrat on the U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee, which is also probing the Trump campaign's Russia ties, said there was no contradiction between being appalled at Comey's handling of the Clinton case and at his firing.

Schiff noted that Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has recused himself from the Russia investigation because he had met with a Russian diplomat during the transition, had signed off on the firing.

"The decision by a president whose campaign associates are under investigation by the FBI for collusion with Russia to fire the man overseeing that investigation, upon the recommendation of an attorney general who has recused himself from that investigation, raises profound questions about whether the White House is brazenly interfering in a criminal matter," he said.

 

Reader Comments
(0)

 
 

Powered by ROAR Online Publication Software from Lions Light Corporation
© Copyright 2017

Rendered 05/19/2017 05:32