Heritage Florida Jewish News - Central Florida's Independent Jewish Voice

Polish righteous gentiles honored as role models for future generations

 

(L-r), United States Ambassador to Poland Stephen Mull, President of the Polish Society of the Righteous Dr. Anna Stupnicka Bando, Executive Vice President of JFR Stanlee Stahl, Polish Consul General to New York City Ewa Junczyk-Ziomecka, Poland's Chief Rabbi Michael Schudrich, and Israel Ambassador to Poland Zvi Rav-Ner.

WARSAW, Poland-The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous (JFR) recognized 40 non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews during WWII in one of the largest-ever gatherings of Holocaust rescuers at the Warsaw Marriott Hotel recently. These righteous gentiles, all of whom are well into their 80s including one who just turned 97, are dwindling in number, such that the JFR luncheon is likely to be among the last of commemorations of its kind.

The event was attended by government officials, foreign diplomats and community leaders, including United States Ambassador to Poland Stephen Mull, Israel Ambassador to Poland Zvi Rav-Ner, Polish Consul General to New York City Ewa Junczyk-Ziomecka, Poland's Chief Rabbi Michael Schudrich, and President of the Polish Society of the Righteous Dr. Anna Stupnicka Bando, all of whom expressed their gratitude to the righteous gentiles.

"The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous is proud to recognize Polish rescuers as role models for future generations," said Executive Vice President of the JFR Stanlee Stahl. "The noble deeds of these righteous gentiles made it possible for Jews to survive the horror of the Holocaust. Their unselfish acts gave persecuted Jews hope then and continue to provide hope today."

The JFR provides monthly financial support to some 300 aged and needy Polish rescuers of Jews during the Holocaust. In the calendar year 2014, the JFR will send a total of approximately $1 million to rescuers living in Poland.

The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous was created in 1986 to provide financial assistance to non-Jews who risked their lives and often the lives of their families to shelter and rescue Jews during the Holocaust. Today, the JFR supports some 575 aged and needy rescuers in 21 countries.  The Foundation also runs an internationally lauded Holocaust education program for middle and high school teachers and Holocaust center personnel who preserve the legacy of the rescuers by teaching the history of the Holocaust.

 

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