Heritage Florida Jewish News - Central Florida's Independent Jewish Voice

UCF Judaic Studies offers 10 courses (3 on-line) this spring

 


The Jewish Studies Program at the University of Central Florida will offer 10 courses in the upcoming spring semester, which begins Jan. 12, 2015. The courses to be offered are: Elementary Modern Hebrew I & II, Conversational Israeli Hebrew, American Jewish History, Classic Texts of Judaism, The Book of Job, Wanderings: The Jewish People in Dispersion, Modern Jewish Experience, Literature of the Holocaust, and our newest addition to the Judaic Studies curriculum: Building A Nation-The Challenges to and Accomplishments Of The State of Israel.

Members of the community are encouraged to take the on-line as well as other Judaic Studies courses

“Elementary Modern Hebrew Language and Culture I” is designed to continue the study of modern Hebrew; increase proficiency in conversation, reading and writing skills, and further expose students to Israeli culture. Elementary Modern Hebrew II or equivalent is prerequisite. This class will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. in Business Administration I, room 221. The course will be taught by Sanford Olshansky.

Elementary Modern Hebrew II for the second semester is designed to teach major language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, and to introduce the student to Israeli culture and Jewish civilization. First semester Hebrew or its equivalent is prerequisite. The course is open to students and members of the community who have had some background in Hebrew, equivalent to one semester. The course has two different sections, taught on Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon in Business Administration I, room 221. The course will be taught by Sanford Olshansky.

Conversational Israeli Hebrew focuses on current events and uses the media to aquaint students with contemporary Israeli usage. First year Hebrew (HBR 1120 and 1121) or an equivalent are perquisites. The class will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 3 p.m. in the Classroom 1 building, room 220, will be taught by Dr. Moshe Pelli.

On-Line course: Classic Texts of Judaism, The course objective is to introduce the classical writings of Judaism, particularly the documents that took shape in the formative age of that civilization, from the first through the seventh centuries of the Common Era. The classic texts of Judaism: the Hebrew Scriptures, the Mishnah, Talmud, and Midrash, are introduced. This is carried out through a close reading, in English, of selected passages, with systematic attention to the rhetorical, logical, and topical aspects of Judaism as related to the written and oral laws. An overview of these basic texts of Judaism and their development and interpretation in the Middle Ages and modern times will be discussed and analyzed. The course will explore how these books form the tenets of the Jewish religion and will be taught on-line by Julia Phillips Berger.

The Book of Job is a study of the Book of Job in translation. It will focus on biblical and post-biblical views of evil, human suffering, divine justice, and religious devotion. The course explores the Book of Job as literature, ethics, and the theology of human protest, faith, and recovery, in face of adversity. How do we reconcile the predominance of evil with the traditional faith in an omnipotent and benevolent God? How do we explain and deal with human suffering—our own and others? This class will meet on Tuesdays at noon in the Burnett Honors College, Room 129. This mediated class will be taught by Dr. Kenneth Hanson.

On-Line course: Modern Jewish Experience introduces the classical writings of Judaism, particularly the documents that took shape in the formative age of that civilization, from the first through the seventh centuries of the Common Era. The classic texts of Judaism: the Hebrew Scriptures, the Mishnah, Talmud, and Midrash, are introduced. This is carried out through a close reading, in English, of selected passages, with systematic attention to the rhetorical, logical, and topical aspects of Judaism as related to the written and oral laws. An overview of these basic texts of Judaism and their development and interpretation in the Middle Ages and modern times will be discussed and analyzed. The course will explore how these books form the tenets of the Jewish religion. Julia Phillips Berger will teach this web-based course.

In Wanderings: The Jewish People in Dispersion, students will learn of life and history of the Jews in the medieval and modern worlds, including topics such as the Jewish-Christian relations; development of Jewish philosophy and mysticism; Jewish life in Eastern Europe and in the Arab countries; the Holocaust; Modern Israel; and Jews and Judaism in North America. This mediated class will meet on Tuesdays 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., in the Communications Building I, Room 109, and will be taught by Dr. Ken Hanson.

Literature of the Holocaust is a study of the traumatic experience of the Holocaust in Europe as expressed and depicted in contemporary Jewish and Hebrew literature (in translation). Authors to be studied include: Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, Aharon Appelfeld, Ka’Tzetnik, H. Bartov, G. Gouri, Y. Amichai, and J. Kosinski. Dr. Moshe Pelli will be teaching this course on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. in the Burnett Honors College, Room 128.

On-Line course: Building A Nation-The Challenges to and Accomplishments Of The State of Israel is our newest addition to the Judaic Studies Program. This on-line course serves as an introduction to the development of Israel as a nation. It is intended to integrate the elements of nation building, the role of religion, culture, science, hi-tech and higher education. This course includes the following: (a) elements of nation building; (b) strategic planning and how this process facilitates nation building; (c) industrial and service development policies and fostering change; (d) the role of religion in fostering the cultural development of a nation; e) the role of science, high-tech, and higher education; (f) the role of military service in the IDF and the relationship to business and industrial development.

Students may take the listed courses as electives or as required courses to satisfy requirements for a Minor in Judaic Studies (18 credits of upper division courses). A Certificate in Judaic Studies is also available for students completing five courses in Judaic Studies. The Foreign Language Requirements may be satisfied with Hebrew language courses. Liberal Studies students are encouraged to take a minor in Judaic Studies. Students who take a Minor in Religious Studies, Humanities, or Middle East Studies are encouraged to take courses in Judaic Studies. Most of our courses may be counted toward their Minors.

Members of the community may take the courses as non-degree-seeking students or may audit the courses. Registration is required of non-degree students; call the Registrar’s office at (407) 823-3100 for details.

Persons 60 years of age or older who meet Florida residency requirements may register for classes without payment. Seniors should call Kent Woodford at (407) 823-5148 (kwoodfor@mail.ucf.edu), to obtain registration forms in advance.

Registration for degree students is through Jan. 11, 2015. Registration for non-degree students and senior citizens is Jan. 9, 2015. Classes begin Jan. 12, 2015.

For information, please call Dr. Moshe Pelli, director of the Judaic Studies Program, at (407) 823-5039; or: 823-5129. Visit the website at Judaicstudies.cah.ucf.edu/.

 

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