Heritage Florida Jewish News - Central Florida's Independent Jewish Voice

Mr. Avdija goes to Washington

 

December 25, 2020

Deni Avdija (center right) poses with Israeli Ambassador to the United States Ron Dermer (center left) and other officials.

(JNS) - Israel's Deni Avdija recently moved from Israel to Washington, found an apartment, met with the media at a Washington Wizards press conference and ate his first meal at Chipotle Mexican Grill. "I really liked the idea of Chipotle. I like to eat healthy. And it was kind of healthy!"

Avdija, the 19-year-old Maccabi Tel Aviv phenom, was taken No. 9 overall by the Wizards in the recent NBA Draft. The 6-foot-9 inch, 225-pound forward is excited to play in the NBA and understands what it means to make it to the most elite league in the sport and to represent Israel. "I worked so hard to get here. I am here to show Israelis there is no limit."

In a pre-season debut on Sunday night at the Barclay Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., he played a near-perfect game to the delight of fans-Israeli, Jewish and otherwise. The Wizards have also embraced Israel, where basketball is one of the nation's top sports, and launched a Twitter account in Hebrew.

Israeli-born Liron Fanan, a scout for the Cleveland Cavaliers and the director of player development for the Canton Charge of NBA's G League (and a minor league affiliate of the Cleveland Cavaliers) stresses the importance of Avdija drafting so high and playing in the NBA for Israelis. "It is a great accomplishment for Israel to have another Israeli in the NBA. When Omri [Casspi] went, it made a huge impact. We see where Israel basketball has gone in the 11 years that he played. It got bigger and better, and pushed kids to believe it is possible and to give their all-not just to see basketball as a hobby, but they can dream about the NBA. Deni is a vivid example of it. He probably watched Omri at night and dreamed!"

She also points out that another Israeli was picked in the recent NBA Draft.

"Yam Madar is also a great player. I think Deni helped Yam as well since scouts were watching Israel basketball more," she says. "This is huge for Israel basketball."

Madar was drafted by the Boston Celtics and will remain with his current team, Hapoel Tel Aviv of Israeli's Premier League, for at least one more season. "It puts Israel on the sports map in the world and gives kids reason to keep trying their best," adds Fanan.

Avdija spoke with the media about the contrast between growing up and playing in Israel, and now playing being on a bigger stage in a much bigger country. "I grew up in a comfortable environment where everyone knew me," he says. "Now is a new beginning, a new career. It's like starting over again. I am a tough kid who has been through a lot. I am ready!"

And he will have the support of the local Jewish and Israeli communities. Casspi, his mentor and friend who played 11 years in the NBA, has helped prepare Avdija for the experience. Casspi is well-known for representing Israel and Judaism in a positive way, including speaking with and signing autographs for his many fans, and for bringing fellow NBA players to visit Israel-often with a visit to his parents' home for a meal. Casspi has also participated in Basketball Without Borders, a program sponsored by the NBA and other organizations that brings together the top 60 or more boys and girls ages 17 and under from 22 countries. The group traveled to Israel in 2017.

Once it is deemed safe in terms of the coronavirus, Avdija is looking forward to interacting with audiences. "Israeli fans are the best," he exclaims. "There are Israeli and Jewish fans in the United States, and I will have their support. I will represent Israel and the Jewish community the best as I can."

'A major chapter in the country's basketball story'

Matthew Levitt, a Fromer-Wexler Fellow and the director of the Jeanette and Eli Reinhard Program on Counterterrorism & Intelligence at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, appreciates both Avdija's basketball skills and the educational prospects his playing in Washington have to offer. "It will also be an opportunity for D.C. sports fans to get to know an Israeli athlete who reflects aspects of Israeli culture they may not be familiar with," he said. "Israeli society is about more than conflict and religion. The child of a Muslim father and Jewish mother who grew up on a kibbutz, Avdija may challenge some common misperceptions about Israel. He will certainly challenge those assigned to defend him on the court!"

Marc Stein, the NBA correspondent for The New York Times, notes a wonderful irony in Avdija, a Maccabi Tel Aviv star, who is now joining the Washington Wizards. "People may not remember that the Wizards, then known as the Bullets, were the first NBA franchise to play Maccabi in the late 1970s, and now Deni goes to the nation's capital as the first NBA lottery pick in Israeli history," he writes. "It's a great opportunity for him because the Wizards wanted him badly and never thought he would slip to them at No. 9, and it's obviously a major chapter in the country's basketball story."

An additional irony is that Avdija joins the team whose name was changed from Bullets, stemming directly from the sadness then team owner Abe Pollin felt when his dear friend, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, was assassinated by a bullet in 1995.

While eager to start his NBA career, Avdija realizes that he will miss a lot of things about Israel, including friends and family. He quips that he will also miss good Israeli hummus, but adds that "hopefully, good guides will show me some."

One reporter on the recent Zoom media session pointed out that there indeed is a restaurant that serves the iconic Middle Easter dish very close to the Capital One Arena. Avdija was pleased.

He also acknowledges he will miss Israel's stunning shorelines. "I love to go to the beach, but it is not an option. I will find new hobbies for sure."

The youthful Avdija playfully notes that he is "excited to play against the NBA greats-all the guys I played against when I was little ... in video games!"

In fact, he continues to be positive about all that awaits. After all, he declares: "You gotta do what you gotta do!"

 

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