Hedy Lamarr honored in Casselberry

 

March 17, 2023

Shown here (l-r): Anthony Aramendia, vice president, Society for Historic Casselberry; Don Epps, president, Seminole County Historical Society; Bob Dallari, Seminole County Commissioner, District 1; Dr. Deborah Bauer, president, Society for Historic Casselberry; Jerry Klinger, president, Jewish American Society for Historic Preservation; and Lee Constantine, Seminole County Commission, District 3.

On Sunday, March 12, the Jewish American Society for Historic Preservation, the Casselberry Historical Society and the Seminole County Historical Society erected a marker honoring Hedy Lamarr.

Lamarr is most remembered for her acting career, starring in more than two dozen movies. She is not as well remembered as the inventor, with George Antheil, of a secret communication system, patented in 1942. This system was used by the Allied Powers against Nazi Germany during World War II and allowed "frequency jumping" of radio waves in torpedo guidance. Lamarr gave it to the U.S. Government because she of her love for America., having moved here with her family in 1938 and becoming a naturalized citizen in 1953. The government set the system aside until 1960 when they discovered its valuable uses, including making Wi-Fi and cellular phone technology possible. Lamarr and Antheil were inducted into the National Inventor's Hall of Fame posthumously in 2014.

The marker was placed in Casselberry because Lamarr retired to Casselberry in her later years. In fact, the home she lived in can be seen across the lake from where the marker stands in Red Bug Lake Park. This marker, sponsored by JASHP, is the first permanent historical marker honoring the life and accomplishments of Hedy Lamarr in the world.

Speaking at the event were Anthony Aramendia, vice president of the Society for Historic Casselberry; Dons Epps, president, Seminole County Historical Society; Rabbi Amram Hoffer of Chabad of Greater Orlando gave the invocation; Dr. Deborah Bauer, president of the Society for Historic Casselberry; Jerry Klinger, president, Jewish American Society for Historic Preservation; and Bob Dallari, Seminole County Commissioner, District 1.

 

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